The Snake Plant – (an air purifying plant)

The snake plant (sansevieria trifasciata laurentii) is in the succulent family and is a great choice as a houseplant. Not only does it add color and vibrancy it purifies the air. The snake plant gets its name because the long thin leaves look similar to the scales of a snake. Another common name is “Mother In Law’s Tongue” because of its sharp points at the end of each leaf.

If you are looking for a houseplant and are plant challenged, the Snake Plant is the one for you. It is a low maintenance non-fussy plant. In addition to being a low maintenance plant is also acts as an air purifier for your home. NASA research has proven that snake plants clean the air of toxins such as formaldehyde and benzene.
The snake plant has sword shaped waxy leaves and grows tall and thick making it a great addition to any décor.

snake plant

Snake plants thrive in most conditions in your house including indirect sunlight allowing you to grow it in almost any room in your home.  It requires sparse watering, in fact it likes to dry out in between watering.  When the soil is very dry, water the plant. Use a water meter to measure the moisture towards the bottom of the pot. Even though it may look dry on the surface, the soil could still be moist down below. Remember, overwatering is the number one killer of the Snake Plant.  Insect and diseases are also uncommon with the snake plant as well. Apply a houseplant fertilizer like Miracle-Gro All-Purpose Plant Food or Schultz All purpose Liquid Plant Food every 2 weeks to insure a healthy plant.

A great way to have a happy lifestyle is to keep a snake plant in your house and to have a great relationship with your mother-in-law. The last thing you need is unhealthy air in your house or the sharp tongue of your mother-in-law. We have a beautiful selection here at The Dees’ and as always, we welcome your questions to help with your problems (plant problems that is). Stop by and see Bob in our Greenhouse – He can help with both.

Joe Dee
joe@deesnursery.com

Garden Tips For Growing The Juiciest and Tastiest Tomatoes!

You always remember a good juicy tomato bursting with flavor!

Each tomato has the potential to be juicy and full of flavor a extra attention now will pay off big when it is time to harvest. Here are a few tips to help you achieve that goal:

  1. Healthy soil, healthy plants. Enrich soil with a good fertilizer amendment and compost every other week to keep plants supplied with their necessary nutrients.
  2. Remove damaged plants. Remove any fruit that shows dark patches on their bottom. These leathery patches, known as blossom end rot, cannot be reversed.
  3. Water well.  In hot weather, tomato plants need deep waterings. Tomatoes are also less vulnerable to cracking when the soil is kept moist.
  4. Cover the soil. Mulch will help block weeds  Mulch will save water and protects your fruit. Spread a 2-3” layer of mulch around plants, leaving 2” of room around the stem so water can reach the roots.
  5. Protect plants from heat. Hot sun has the potential to cause sun-scald, leaving tomatoes with pale, leathery patches on the fruits that pucker when they should be ripening. Bushy plants with lots of leaves naturally shade fruit from sun, however, plants with less leaves are more vulnerable. Cover plants with lightweight cloth covers through the first few heat waves.
  6. Remove tomato suckers. These small shoots sprout out from where the stem and the branch of a tomato plant meet. Though harmless, tomato suckers drain energy away from the main stems.

You pick tomatoes when you are ready for them, avoid letting them get soft and mushy. Tomatoes picked at the breaker stage, when they first show signs of changing color, are considered vine-ripened. These tomatoes will continue to ripen off the vine and on your kitchen counter.  Tomatoes picked at the breaking stage can still have the same flavor as one that has fully ripened on the vine. Never place tomatoes in the refrigerator to ripen.

History Of Mother’s Day

The earliest Mother’s Day celebrations we know of were ancient Greek spring celebrations in honor of Rhea, the mother of the gods. But those were in honor of one particular mother. England’s “Mothering Sunday,” begun in the 1600’s, is closer to what we think of as “Mother’s Day.” Celebrated on the 4th Sunday of Lent, “Mothering Sunday” honored the mothers of England.

In 1907 Anna Jarvis started a drive to establish a national Mother’s Day. In 1907 she passed out 500 white carnations at her mother’s church in West Virginia — one for each mother in the congregation. In 1908, her mother’s church held the first Mother’s Day service, on May 10th (the second Sunday in May). That same day a special service was held at the Wanamaker Auditorium in Philadelphia, where Anna was from, which could seat no more than a third of the 15,000 people who showed up.

By 1909, churches in 46 states, Canada and Mexico were holding Mother’s Day services. In the meantime, Ms. Jarvis had quit her job to campaign full time. She managed to get the World’s Sunday School Association to help; they were a big factor in convincing legislators to support the idea. In 1912, West Virginia was the first state to designate an official Mother’s Day. By 1914, the campaign had convinced Congress, which passed a joint resolution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the resolution, establishing an official national Mother’s Day on the second Sunday in May.

Many countries of the world now have their own Mother’s Day at different times of the year, but Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Japan, and Turkey join the US in celebrating Mother’s Day on the second Sunday of May. Britain still celebrates Mothering Day on the 4th Sunday of Lent — but they now call it Mother’s Day. By any name, and at any date, it’s a special day to honor a special person.

The most popular flower for Mother’s Day is the classic Rose. How classic a beauty is the Rose? It is delicate and fragrant like Mom, remember that sweet smell when she kissed those “boo-boos” or leaned over to hug you goodnight? Roses are tough too, just like Mom…don’t mess with her offspring! Most of all they are beautiful and admired for their strength and endurance. Maybe that is why the rose is the symbol of Mother’s Day! It exemplifies Mom in so many ways.

We are at the peak of our flowering season and what better way to celebrate Mother’s Day than presenting Mom with a beautiful blooming Rosebush!